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Bite Terminator Protects AEP Workers
By Michelle Blum
The Intelligencer
Wheeling, West Virginia

AEP employees began carrying the Bite Terminator on their belts this week, hoping to decrease the over 66 dogs bites in the last 3 years. AEP officials say the unit seems like a menacing device in a belt-side holster but it’s actually a humane tool that helps employees avoid canine attacks.

“At AEP, we take employee and public safety very seriously. Every year, our personnel sustain injuries from dog attacks, some of them serious and all of them painful. We have trained our workers with techniques to avoid dog attacks for quite some time. Nevertheless, dogs that appear friendly or tame often turn vicious in a split second without warning,” said Garbashe, who supervises meter readers.

He noted that in such cases, the Bite Terminator is very useful because it deflects the attack without hurting the animal. And the products human method has brought endorsements from various animal protection agencies and veterinarians throughout the United States and Canada.

SaskPower meter reader Cindy Soles says she has used the Bite Terminator Dog Barrier on the job. Herald photo by Karen Longwell

Dog bites will hopefully become a thing of the past for local meter readers as SaskPower becomes the first organization in the province to implement a new safety technology.

The Bite Terminator is used by utilities and other organizations in Canada and the United States as a way to keep workers safe from aggressive dogs while on the job. About the size of a regular umbrella, the unit can be deployed in as little as 0.6 seconds – blocking the dog’s visibility.

“Should one of our meter readers encounter a dog that poses a threat, this device can be used to help prevent injuries – to both our meter readers and the animal.”

Dog bites are one of the leading causes of injury to meter readers, according to SaskPower. Of the 53 injuries or near injuries that occurred in 2007, 83 per cent were the result of an encounter with a dog.